Tag: Classical Theism

Two kinds of Gods (Superman vs. The Force)

Two kinds of Gods (Superman vs. The Force)

As I wrap up my (brief) exploration of classical theism and move into the process theology of John Cobb, I’m having trouble keeping track of the many different concepts of God floating around in my head.  To add a little structure to this mess, I’ve constructed two basic categories for notions of God.  Although these don’t by any means capture all of the nuance of different perspectives, they help identify a fault line that divides many believers. Continue reading “Two kinds of Gods (Superman vs. The Force)”

Old-school concepts of God are actually kind of intuitive

Old-school concepts of God are actually kind of intuitive

Back in December, I spent a month really exploring atheism.  I read a book by Richard Dawkins, began listening through a cool atheist podcast, and listened to a few lectures on influential skeptical thinkers, from Hume to Marx.  Although I have believed in God for as long as I can remember, I emerged from my Month of Skepticism with a clearer sense of my own doubts.  I concluded that there were, in fact, many good reasons to not believe in God.  I couldn’t help but notice that my idea of God was strikingly unnecessary and counter-intuitive.

But recently, that story has begun to change. Continue reading “Old-school concepts of God are actually kind of intuitive”

The God of Classical Theism

On several occasions (and especially at the end of my Month of Skepticism), I’ve noted that the concept of God I grew up with has some major problems.  Many of these problems have to do with understanding how God acts in the world, the problem of evil, and science.  My God Project, in large part, is my attempt to give these questions serious attention – and also to see if I can find a better way of thinking of God.

From the outset, I expected to find good answers in contemporary theology.  After all, many of my questions have to do with characteristically modern (and postmodern) concerns: modern science, the unhinged chaos of the 20th century, the intellectual and cultural viability of atheism etc.  But to my surprise, I’m starting to think that many good answers may come from premodern ways of thinking. Continue reading “The God of Classical Theism”